Changing the Language of the Law
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Changing the Language of the Law The Sri Lanka Experience (Publications of the International Center for Research on Bilingualism) by L. J. Mark Cooray

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Published by Pr De L"universite Laval .
Written in English

Subjects:

  • Law,
  • Law Systems,
  • Languages,
  • Law and legislation,
  • Politics and government,
  • Sri Lanka

Book details:

The Physical Object
FormatPaperback
Number of Pages183
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL8940138M
ISBN 102763770800
ISBN 109782763770802

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